Senior class experiences realistic car crash demonstration

Devon Braunstein ('10)/ Eastside Managing Editor

On Thursday, May 27, the entire senior class gathered outside of Cherry Hill East in the Main Entrance parking lot to view a drunk driving car crash demonstration put together by the Cherry Hill Police and Fire Department, topping off an effective assembly by The Brain Injury Institute.  After watching a slide show presentation organized by Director Sue Quick, two audience members, Rachel Elimelech (’10) and Rob Riches (’10), were brought on stage to experience varying levels of impaired vision due to intoxication.  The students tried on two different pairs of goggles and took four intoxication tests: clicking a pen, walking in a line, dribbling a basketball and picking up keys from the floor.

Outside, four student volunteers, Julia Susuni (’10), Justin Henderson (’10), Lucas Kappler (’10) and Marissa Zietz (’10) were made up prior to the crash demonstration with faux make-up injuries to mimic a tragic car accident.  The Cherry Hill Police and Firemen mocked a real accident as they rushed into the Main Entrance parking lot, car lights flashing and sirens blaring, and cut through the vehicle, cutting through glass and tearing off car doors.  The passengers were treated as crash victims as the paramedics carefully lifted the actors on to gurneys and rolled them into the ambulance.  The audience stood in silence behind the barriers of caution tape as they witnessed a life-like, fatal car accident scenario that would hopefully affect them for the rest of their lives.

After the demonstration, students filed back inside the auditorium for a question and answer session with speaker Traffic Sergeant Mike Rann.

“We’re asking you to think about what you do before you do it,” s

Devon Braunstein ('10)/ Eastside Managing Editor

aid Rann, as he discussed the tragic effects of drunk driving.

Cherry Hill Traffic Unit Policeman Jim Weist said the Police and

Fire Departments’ main goal for the demonstration is to get students to make good choices.  “[They] get to see what the worst result is.  Your worst possible choice has the worst possible effect.”