The School Newspaper of Cherry Hill High School East

Eastside

The School Newspaper of Cherry Hill High School East

Eastside

The School Newspaper of Cherry Hill High School East

Eastside

Redefining Resolutions: A New Outlook for 2024

Redefining+Resolutions%3A+A+New+Outlook+for+2024
Katie Sullivan

As the calendar beckons a new year, people rush to make resolutions in pursuit of bettering themselves. “I want to get straight As. I want to work out every day.” While some new routines make it to December, others give out by March. Though it may seem like a positive way to implement better routines, we fail to recognize the pitfalls of the system. If you push yourself to do things you do not enjoy, you will never accomplish them. I propose a new system that will continue bringing good intentions into the new year but will have a higher likelihood of sustaining through 2024.
Firstly, it is essential to address some of the issues behind resolutions. New Year’s resolutions encourage an all-or-nothing mindset. When we deviate from our resolution, it’s easy to consider it a failure. This outlook makes it more challenging to bounce back from everyday setbacks. Instead, we should foster a forgiving mindset that allows us to stray from goals. Goals are goals – they should not be definitive; we are human.
These goals sometimes tend to be unrealistic or lofty as well. Whether it’s losing excessive weight in a short period or spending less money, such expectations can lead to disappointment when they prove unsuccessful. The pressure to achieve these unrealistic goals can contribute to stress and negatively impact mental health. These unrealistic goals, like weight loss, are often to appeal to societal norms.
A new system everyone should start to foster is doing something you already enjoy more often. This way, it won’t push you to do things you hate and cause you to quit in a few months. I am not saying that you should not set high goals for yourself- it is important to try new things- but it’s important to make them realistic. Yet, doing something as simple as baking more often, or whatever your hobbies may be, will make you happier and more productive. Other examples include going to your happy place more often, like the beach. These smaller goals can improve your mental health and increase your likelihood of success because you’ll look forward to doing the activity.
For example, last year, I set a goal to read 30 books in 2023. I successfully finished my goal because it was already a hobby I enjoyed. I wanted to push myself to read more often because it improved my mood. I ended the year feeling accomplished and happy. I stuck with it throughout the year because it was a realistic goal that I could set for myself. I knew that I could not pursue a goal of 100 books due to my high school schedule, and that was fine.
However, a counter-argument can be that I started playing golf last year, which is something I never thought I would do. I eventually learned that I enjoyed it, which made it easier to stick with it. Adding something new to your routine is always positive as long as you love it.
While the tradition of New Year’s resolutions is deeply ingrained in our culture, examining its impact on our lives is crucial. Rather than succumbing to the pressure of setting grand resolutions, consider embracing a positive and accepting mindset throughout the year.

Story continues below advertisement
Leave a Comment
About the Contributor
Katie Sullivan, Eastside Art Director
Katie Sullivan is a junior and one of Eastside’s Art Directors. Aside from drawing for Eastside, Katie sings in Chansons and Voce, plays for East girls golf team, and volunteers for Interact. In her free time, you can catch Katie baking, reading, listening to music, or with friends and family.

Comments (0)

All Eastside Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *