How to find cult films

Laura Kane ('11)/Eastside Staff

Local video rental stores carry all of the new releases from comedy to horror, and most movies made in the last five years can be found on those many shelves. Cult films, however, can be harder to find.

The best place to find cult films is online. One of the more popular websites is http://www.cultfilmz.com, created by Ron Altman. The website evaluates cult films from around the world. In each main geographic area, Altman reviews a movie once a day, in addition to giving links to sites where visitors can purchase the films. He reviews the movie along with the DVD’s special features. But Altman’s cult reviews aren’t the only ones on the website; members of cultfilmz.com are also encouraged to submit their own movie reviews.

Although cult films are usually only found online, Altman doesn’t have a problem with this.

“Cults films are supposed to be rare, hard to find or even out of print, limited availability plays an important part,” he said.

http://www.gottaseedvds.com is a website dedicated to helping cult followers find rare films. The site is set up so fans can easily find the movie they are looking for. Films are divided into cult film genres, such as celebrity lost films and exploitation films. The site also has the category of ultra rare films, making it much easier for especially rare DVDs to be found. The website guarantees all films, rare or not, to be the best print quality in America.

Another website that features cult films is http://www.coverpops.com. Site creator Jim Bumgardner created a clickable collage of over 300 DVD covers. To find a particular film, click the DVD cover and a list of information is given on the movie, including its release date and where to find it.  There are nine cult film collages, ranging from anime to science fiction. The collages are arranged horizontally by time and are updated frequently.

Cult films are too difficult to find outside of the internet, making it almost impossible to see cult films in movie theaters. The Trocadero in Philadelphia provides a place for cult followers to see cult pictures, on a “state of the art DVD projector and brand new full-size movie screen.” Every Monday night, cult films such as the The Big Lebowski and The Rocky Horror Picture Show are shown. People who attend Monday Movie Night pay three dollars for the screening, which includes food and drink. Staff members dress up as characters in the movie and encourage guests to do the same.

Outside of attending these events at the Trocadero, anyone interested in viewing cult films is encouraged to purchase them online and view them at their own leisure.