Venues should limit the amount of alcohol consumed by visitors

Photo+courtesy+of+kusu.co.uk.+

Photo courtesy of kusu.co.uk.

Jenna Myers, Eastside Opinions Editor

Many people go to venues such as the Wells Fargo Center and the Electric Factory for concerts; however at these places, and many more around the United States, there is no limit on how much alcohol can be sold to the each visitor on one night.

In late September, I went to my first concert and the one thing I observed more than anything else was the group of men sitting next to me who got extremely drunk as the night went on. Within the three hour period of the concert, these men kept leaving the show to get more and more beer at a venue concession stand that mainly sold alcohol.

Of course, there is nothing wrong with legally drinking alcohol at a concert, but these men were not limited on how much beer they could buy and consume in one night. The only issue I had with this was that these men, and probably a lot of other drunk people at the concert, were most likely going to drive home under the influence, which means that these people had a greater chance of getting into car accidents after the show.

Places that hold concerts should be aware that the probability of a person drinking at a concert and then driving home afterwards is high. The venue should make sure that the alcohol concession stands can only sell a certain amount of alcohol to people instead of allowing them to buy as much alcohol as they want, just because they have a valid ID.

Since the maximum Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) for an adult driver is .08 percent (until they are deemed under the influence), bartenders should be aware of who will be driving home that night and make sure that those drivers do not go over that BAC limit.

The bartenders should refuse to sell any more alcohol to the driver after they get to .08 percent BAC. They should also limit the driver’s friends on how much more alcohol they can get so the friends do not buy and give more alcohol to the driver. By doing this, there will be one person who is eligible to drive home without getting arrested, while the drunk friends can be in the back of the car.

To also help prevent people from driving home drunk after these events, taxi drivers located in the area should be stationed at the events in order to give drunk people rides home to decrease the chances of any DUI crashes.

Just by limiting the amount of alcohol sold or consumed to a single person at an event in these venues could help other people’s safety on the road. Venues will help prevent DUI-related car crashes after the events and taxi drivers can make more profit by helping the drunken groups of people arrive back home in a safe manner.