Benchmarks should warm the bench:

Carly Zive ('13)/Eastside staff

Benchmarks, or any accumulative test for that matter, typically aren’t the highlight of a student’s high school career. Studying a single chapter of work for a class tends to be extremely stressful. Thus, studying for more than one chapter is even more difficult.

In many courses, specifically Science and Math, there is a curriculum requirement that every few chapters a benchmark must be given (on top of the final in June which tests on information learned throughout the entire year).

 Though the Board of Education may say that such a test should be a requirement, they should examine the time consuming, pointless studying hours the test offers.   

Many students fail to remember all of the material that will be on their benchmark. Therefore, teachers must review the material that was previously tested on, although some teachers do not go back and review thus causing frustration for their students. 

“Benchmarks cause extra stress and are unnecessary to administer,” said Alyssa Warren (’12). “It’s like a final every marking period.”

In classes, there are those students who excel and those who do the opposite. No matter where one might fall between the two, being tested on material 2 or 3 times is ridiculous.

Requiring students to remember information three separate times, once for the first test, once for the benchmark, and once more for the final, proves nothing about their ability to actually understand it. One may excel on the test, but completely fail the benchmark. Practice does not always make perfect.

But, until a solution is found to better improve the curriculum, benchmarks will remain as they are. So for now, students will be tested on information three times, and two times too many.