WeTip program helps limit crime in Cherry Hill

Zach Padersky, For Eastside

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WeTip is an anonymous crime reporting hotline that has been at Cherry Hill High School East and throughout the Cherry Hill School District for over ten years.

The hotline is a nationwide organization that was brought in by Cherry Hill Public Schools and is run by the Cherry Hill Police Department, the school’s campus police and the employees of WeTip.

WeTip is just a phone call away and can be reached at any time on any day of the week. The caller is immediately connected to a human operator that can communicate in both English and Spanish. Depending on the severity of the issue, the caller is then forwarded to the campus police or the Cherry Hill police department. The caller is kept anonymous throughout the entire investigation.

Lieutenant Mike Nuzzo is the Chief of Campus Police at Cherry Hill East and is an advocate and local leader of the WeTip program.

“The WeTip hotline has been very effective and has allowed the local police to get to the bottom of problems and prevent crimes,” said Nuzzo. Nuzzo also believes that the administrators, teachers and students enjoy having the program available to them.

“It is definitely a plus to have this program,” said Nuzzo.

There are posters around the entire school and the whole district, which advertises this program and the number that people can use to reach WeTip.

Cherry Hill East’s campus security believes that most students and faculty members do not know enough about the program. According campus security, the WeTip hotline is an important asset to have and it limits the amount of crime in the area.

“I think it’s a good idea and it works well because it helps the person in an emergency and safety isn’t as much of a concern,” said Lauren Romisher (’16).

“I teach 1984 and I’m a child of the 1960’s so I’m always in conflict about whistle blowers and ‘watch dog’ groups because they can easily turn into violations of our simple liberties. On the other hand, teaching has become a very dangerous business and schools are not as safe as they used to be, so security is always an issue,” said Julie Bathke, an English teacher at Cherry Hill High School East.