BridalPlasty promotes poor values

Sami Saraczewski (’13)/Eastside staff

Every little girl dreams of being the “fairytale bride”, but on E! Network’s new reality series “BridalPlasty”, twelve brides have taken this fantasy a little too far. The twelve brides-to-be compete for their dream wedding and society’s depiction of a “dream body”.

Every week the girls are given challenges involving bridal activities.  The winner of each challenge wins a procedure from her plastic surgery wish-list, while the girl voted out must leave the house.  She is told goodbye with hosts Shanna Moakler’s catchphrase: “Your wedding will go on; you just won’t be perfect.”

What many of these women fail to realize is that plastic surgery is a permanent change.  No one is perfect, but the fact that these women feel the need to drastically alter their bodies with potentially dangerous surgeries is frightening.  This series delivers the message that perfection and happiness are only achieved when one looks the part of a supermodel.

According to surgery.org, there has been a 147 percent increase in total cosmetic procedures since 1997, including nonsurgical procedures.  By making plastic surgery a prize, society increases the standard of perfection women are held to.  When reporting about “BridalPlasty”, ABC News said, “these makeovers raise troubling social, ethical, and medical issues.”

While plastic surgery will smooth wrinkles and plump lips, beauty lies in the quirks that make us different and unique, which is a lesson that the brides of “BridalPlasty” fail to embrace.