“Borat”: Controversial perspective or perspective controversy?

Justin Horowitz ('10)/ For Eastside

borat.jpgThe now controversial character “Borat” was originated by the character actor Sacha Baron Cohen (Talladega Nights) on the HBO “Da Ali G Show”. As Borat, Cohen gives us one of most brilliant comedic performances in film history, joining the performances of Steve Carrel in “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” or John Belushi in “Animal House.” His actions appear fictional, but Cohen’s fake accent is purely and electrifyingly hilarious; he never shifts character throughout the entire work.

Surrounding this film are many fans and even more opponents. “Borat” was a “mock”umentary, which, is a film which purposely feigns the appearance of a documentary. The people featured throughout the film, except for the fictional Borat and Bagatov, were real and totally unaware of that the two were, in actuality, mere imposters.

A news reporter, who was deceived by Cohen’s unique acting and his fake credentials, interviewed Borat on a talk show and was fired for taking the fictional character seriously. Many are furious at the film’s criticized super-sized bowl of racism and crude humor, showing no mercy to every religion and race in the world. Adding to the controversy are the films’ “players”, who were unaware that the documentary was actually a “mock”umentary, and that Borat was the product of a comic genius’ imagination. The most angered were two members of a fraternity, who were oblivious to Borat’s lack of credibility and said racist and sexist comments on camera.

This film is without a doubt one of the greatest comedies ever made, joining “South Park: Bigger, Longer, And Uncut” and “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” as some of the best modern “simple enjoyment” films. This movie is, potentially, of the most talked about and beloved of the year.

As Borat said, “Please, you come see my film. If it not success, I will be execute.”