The Cherry Hill community shares thoughts on the mayoral election

Voters+choose+Susan+Shin+Angulo+to+be+the+next+Cherry+Hill+Mayor
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The Cherry Hill community shares thoughts on the mayoral election

Voters choose Susan Shin Angulo to be the next Cherry Hill Mayor

Voters choose Susan Shin Angulo to be the next Cherry Hill Mayor

Courtesy of: The Monitor

Voters choose Susan Shin Angulo to be the next Cherry Hill Mayor

Courtesy of: The Monitor

Courtesy of: The Monitor

Voters choose Susan Shin Angulo to be the next Cherry Hill Mayor

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Cherry Hill residents voted yesterday for their new mayor and Cherry Hill council members. The mayoral candidates this year were Democrat Susan Shin Angulo and Republican Nancy Feller O’Dowd. 

O’Dowd and Shin Angulo are both active members of the Cherry Hill community and have lived here for many, many years. O’Dowd is an advanced practice nurse who specializes in geriatric psychiatry and Shin Angulo is a County Freeholder who participates in many Cherry Hill clubs and organizations like the JCC, Cherry Hill Democratic Club, and the Christ Our Light Church. 

The younger of the two candidates, Shin Angulo is 49 years old and is a South Korean immigrant. Her campaign promised to keep Cherry Hill a happy, welcoming place that needs little change, focusing on what residents need and want. O’Dowd promised to bring back the security that living in Cherry Hill has promised because of an increase in burglaries, car thefts, and other issues “surrounding the quality of life and property values.” (Cherry Hill Sun) 

At the polls yesterday, hundreds of people were scurrying about, voting for who they think would be the best for Cherry Hill, and it was collectively decided through the ballots that Shin Angulo is the new mayor of Cherry Hill. 

But, before people returned to their homes for the night after long days at the office, or at school, they made an effort to go out and change the community through their vote in the election.

 Cherry Hill resident Denise Lowell spoke about why she votes: “It’s really very important to me that my voice and opinions are heard in the community. I vote because I have the power to make decisions about local things and I value that the government we live in allows for such a thing”. Many of the voters seconded her thoughts. 

“It’s so important to participate in our community and we should make every attempt we can to ensure that the community’s ideas are reflected in the people who are elected. We live in a democracy, so I think that we should all take that opportunity and lend our voice [to the community]” said resident Ethan Feuller. 

With over 9,000 people in total (9,217 people voting exactly) the residents of Cherry Hill clearly agree with Feuller and Lowell’s ideas on community participation and community involvement.

When asked about what makes a good candidate, Lowell responded that a good candidate must have a clear interest in making a community change and making a difference. “It’s really important that they know the community and are aware of what is important to residents of the community they are attempting to represent”. 

In Feuller’s eyes, a good candidate must be decisive and sure of the things they want in the community. But they also must be able to see what residents want and make the appropriate changes. “If a mayor can’t see what a resident wants, or make the appropriate decisions in appropriate and timely ways, they really don’t meet the criteria for a good mayor”.

Not only did Cherry Hill candidates vote for the new mayor, they also voted for Township Council, with equal parts Democrat and Republican members on the council, with one Independent party member now elected to the council board. According to Feuller and Lowell, the same rules that apply to mayor candidates apply to Township Council candidates as well. “The criteria is really important and in order to have good representation we need good community leaders,” said Lowell.

 

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